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20121128
20121206
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
. as more do, it will create an environment for us to reach an agreement. we need the same willingness to step 4 on the left to be able to meet in this room at the table or wherever the room maybe and to come to an agreement that will lead us forward. one thing i am hoping for is if we can reach an agreement, in principle before the end of the year, then implement it, i believe this is what many have been waiting for to launch a more spirited recovery. if we get this done, if we have a credible $4 trillion deficit reduction plan signed and sealed, signed by the president, what does that say to the rest of the world? many economies in europe and other places are struggling, but ours will be the strongest in the world in terms of the future. it takes a lot of hard work but it is worth the effort. all will prosper. saturday night, my wife and i went to see a movie by spielberg. about another gentleman who lived in illinois for a while named abraham lincoln. toward the end of the movie, daniel day-lewis was sitting across from confederates and there was talk about what the war was all abou
to chain the rules any way. in an environment anything that passes the senate without republican votes is unlikely to pass the house. years to get to every political is to blame instead of having rules. the three times we followed the rules this year, we passed bills. the highway bill, the postal reform bill and the ag bill, all passed. amendments anyone wants to offer and do what the senate does every single time when we did that, we passed a piece of legislation in a bipartisan way. anywhere in the house. at least i would understand there was a governing argument if the majority leader had a said what we pass here is going just going to pass it with all over again. that is not the case, believe me, this is a hornet's nest that makes it harder to get the work done that has to be done and>> questions. >> what filibuster reform would>> what ought to be happening, ought to be sitting down not rules changes are appropriate. agreement, it would be done in a manner consistent with the rules, which would require 67 votes, which i don't wouldit is important to remember that the senate hadn't
to start making decisions now projecting the environment they will be in on january 1. let's give those businesses the service, what they deserve and their employees bypassing this middle class income tax cut now. >> i'd just like to add that the chairman and assistant leader part pants in any number of these budget discussions, that, that or the other one. there were several of them. when they went to that table as representatives of the house democrats, they had no instruction except to reach agreement. they shared the values of our caucus but the over riding value was we had to get the job done for the american people. the only thing i said i wanted to see was jobs and economic growth would be at the centerpiece of the discussions and then whatever decisions we would make about investments or cutting them revenue or raising them would center around how we create jobs. that is the way we are going to reduce the deficit by creating jobs. and every step of the way, every time we came to the idea of big, bold, balanced, the revenue question was the hurdle and it still s. you just can't g
to compete or any company to compete in that kind of environment, you end up harming our domestic production. and one of the reasons we are so elated that our automotive industry is recovering and you see it all over our region, the power of industry to lift people into the middle class and beyond, you can see it everywhere. in suppliers, in restaurants, in theaters, in places where people are going now. even grocery stores, frankly, where people are able to buy more because of the recovery of this powerful, powerful industry and i just want to end with one image which is really hard at that capture in words, but one of our companies in cleveland has the only 50,000-ton press in the united states of america. alcoa. it is seven stories in magnitude. it is hard for the -- i feel very privileged as a representative to have been invited into the company to see this literally mammoth magnificent machine. be able to take part and form them for industry as well as our defense systems. and it's seven stories high. three layers on three stories at the bottom, just dealing with the hydraulics. the eng
economic growth. regulation is necessary to protest at -- to protect our environment and keep our food safe. but regulations cost money to follow. the more expensive a regulation, the less money a business has to give raises or hire new people. we need to have a balanced approach to regulation. we need to weigh the benefit of any given regulation against the impact it will have on job creation. that is why we should implement something like senator paul's act, so that congress that's the final say on it. -- gets the final say on it. [applause] getting control of our debt. it is critically important. it is not enough. we need to do more. we should expand our domestic energy industry. american innovation has given us access to massive new deposits of oil and natural gas, making america one of the most energy- rich countries on the planet. this new energy opens all kinds of new middle-class jobs come from the fields and platforms woodrow, to the manufacturing plants that return to the united states with a lower cost of energy, and these are the types of jobs we need most, right now. middle-cla
what the traffic will bear, but the political environment, the culture on the hill will accommodate. >> dave camp and sander levin cut a deal? >> begin the process and try to confer. if there is a new revenue source, carbon tax, some sort of consumption tax, it will emerge out of their common frustration that they cannot get where they need to go. what we need to do is do not micromanage, don't be prescriptive. give them a number, a ratio of expenditure reductions to tax reform, revenue enhancements, and if that task falls to the -- and give them that task this fall to the committee and over the next six or nine months, task them to meet those numbers. i think the capability is there to do it. it may not be rostenkowski and packwood, but if there is a will, they will get the job done. >> i do not think it is credible to kick the can down the road that far at this point. i think the reaction in the real economy would be devastating. you have to imagine what you are suggesting, vic, which is a good suggestion in the context of doing something now and whether that something is betting
that is on c-span 2. on c-span 3, the senate environment and public works committee will hear about the impact of hurricane sandy. coming up, former congressional leaders talk about what congress learn from the 1990 agreement. from the bipartisan policy center, this is under two hours. >> ok. welcome. i am the director of public administration program. i want to welcome you to the session, which we are calling looking back to move a forward. this is co-sponsored by george mason university and the bipartisan policy center. it is our pleasure to put this on and to recognize with all the frenzy about the fiscal cliff that we have a history. some of the history is successful in resolving deep seated hard choices. that is will we will look back and talk about today and see whether we can learn any lessons from the experience. we will go over the detailed program in a few minutes. i want to introduce our keynote speaker tom davis. he has covered many basis. he was the county executive of fairfax county. he was the representative to congress and became a chair and it did many important hearings and r
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)